Tuesday, June 17, 2008

The curse of the Fox

This weekend, we went to a wedding on my husband's side of the family, and as we waited for the ceremony to begin, something felt off. I couldn't figure out what it was until the bride's sister lit a series of delicate aisle sconces with a long, gold taper. And then it hit me.

No one in my family would do that - because someone else in my family would have crushed the dainty aisle sconces before the bride's sister could get to them. You see, I come from a family of klutzes. Pick an event, any family event, and somebody will fall, topple the Christmas tree, hit another family member's car (Wrecks have happened on several occasions actually. We should phrase invitations: Come to the Fox Family Reunion. Bring your insurance card).

So weddings are always interesting. My brother was married in a lovely historic church in St. Louis. It had just undergone a restoration and had new everything. The caretakers obviously didn't know my family's history or they never would have let us set foot inside the place.

During rehearsal, they showed us a lovely table - original to the church -where the communion wine would be placed. To complicate matters, they wanted the table in the middle of a long aisle, surrounded by my family members. My soon to be sister-in-law protested. She'd been to enough Fox events to know what she was dealing with. Besides, the table was old, valuable and it had very thin legs. The wedding planner - who we likened to the blonde cheerleader in every horror movie who has to go outside to see what that noise is - disregarded sister-in-law's concerns about her new family.

We took bets on who would accidentally knock over the crystal decanter first. I was especially concerned, given I had to walk past the delicate table, in a powder pink bell-skirted dress. You just don't know what the clearance will be on an outfit like that. Thank goodness my cousin, Matt, got to it first. He was an usher, leading people to their seats. Before the ceremony even began, he backed into the table, breaking the crystal pitcher and soaking the church's new carpeting in wine.

Matt was embarrassed to say the least. I'm ashamed to admit that the rest of us were a bit relieved. We knew someone would "Fox-up" that day, and at least it wasn't one of us. Besides, the table survived. That's success in our book.

So it was relaxing this past weekend to attend a wedding and - once I was safely in my seat - to know I'd avoid the Fox curse … at least for the time being.

7 comments:

Ann Aguirre said...

Hehe, I'm glad the table survived.

Natalie Hatch said...

My family usually argue all the time, we can't be in the same room for more than five minutes before there's arguments then the silent treatment. One brother hasn't talked to the family for four years... sheesh, get over it.
My husbands family don't stop talking, they could talk through wet cement! I've told him that Abu Grahib prison has nothing on his family, just put a bunch of terrorists in the middle of a heated Collingwood Football match replay and let his family rip. I usually end up having to go for long silent walks by myself if we stay there for too long.

Lori T said...

Angie,

That is too funny. Our family reunions usually and unfortunatel end up in complete and total drunkeness with the few exceptions being my Mom, sister, and Grandmas. Yes, it is a tad embarrassing, but alas it is true.

I am glad that the wedding was relaxing and nothing bad happened.

Angie Fox said...

Aren't families odd? The wakes on my mom's side of the family tend to turn into some serious parties - specially when the newly deceased has pre-ordered a keg. It's happened more than once. But I think that's another post.

azteclady said...

The curse of the Fox....

I was expecting some dark, Gothic tradition... and I get klutzes :grin:

Angie Fox said...

We could be dark and sexy, with all kinds of Gothic things going on...until somebody trips over a candelabra. Kind of ruins the image.

azteclady said...

I guess it does at that...

It really wouldn't be the same if you guys had to wear body armor to avoid injuries with all the shiny, pointy, sharp things, right?